Post Gallery in wordpress themes by momizat team

Post Gallery in WordPress themes is the most used and popular blogging platform around the web. Its flexibility, usability and customizability are the main reasons people regard WordPress so high. Another reason is the huge array of themes available for WordPress – you can create almost anything, from online magazines to advanced e-commerce businesses. wordpress themes You can either get themes for free or pay for them. Of course, you get what you pay for — yet don’t be too eager to spend your money on something you might not even need. If you’re just starting out with WordPress I suggest reading Choosing a WordPress Theme: Free or Premium? After that you might consider whether you really want to pay for that premium theme. wordpress themes If the answer is no, continue reading and check out these 80 professional, beautiful and free WordPress themes from 2012 — the best free themes that can be found!

Vestibulum sit amet ante eget diam scelerisque eleifend. Nam metus mauris, cursus non suscipit ut, faucibus ut quam. Quisque ac scelerisque dolor. Nam sapien leo, euismod id elementum ut, dapibus eget elit. Nunc posuere porttitor nulla facilisis congue. Maecenas molestie quam eu nibh porttitor, vitae vestibulum turpis molestie. Sed quis mauris vitae dolor imperdiet pharetra. Sed et eros eget sapien tempor cursus sit amet eget eros. Nunc a mauris imperdiet, scelerisque diam laoreet, consequat nibh. Morbi gravida ornare sem, aliquet vehicula augue egestas eget. Sed mollis fringilla enim, ac accumsan metus porta et. Fusce ut lacinia ante, et pretium velit. Nullam eget metus enim. Vestibulum mollis leo in nulla tristique, sit amet tincidunt nibh tincidunt. Cras at sem at leo pretium bibendum et at nisl. Pellentesque odio enim, consectetur vitae commodo non, facilisis tincidunt justo.

  • Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.
  • Curabitur suscipit elit vel quam mattis laoreet.
  • Duis non diam ut nulla sollicitudin porta.
  1. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit.
  2. Curabitur suscipit elit vel quam mattis laoreet.
  3. Duis non diam ut nulla sollicitudin porta.

Duis tortor metus, accumsan in elit eget, porttitor sollicitudin ante. Sed in nunc sem. Ut tincidunt libero sed tortor vulputate, sit amet interdum urna eleifend. Ut porta justo a mauris aliquam tincidunt. Maecenas faucibus ultrices mauris ac lacinia. Maecenas eget urna leo. Maecenas congue mauris erat, in eleifend ante eleifend quis. In quis leo sit amet nibh imperdiet dignissim. Morbi malesuada luctus tortor, id cursus diam venenatis non. Nulla sit amet dui metus. Ut at interdum ipsum, ac ornare lacus. Etiam rutrum magna diam, sed luctus risus consectetur at. Vestibulum sodales purus eget consectetur tincidunt. Praesent augue nisl, consectetur a leo vel, vehicula dapibus nibh.

[quote font=”verdana” font_size=”14″ font_style=”italic” color=”#474747″ bgcolor=”#F5F5F5″ bcolor=”#dd9933″ arrow=”yes” align=”centre”]This Demo Content Brought to you by Momizat Team [/quote]

this is tags and keywords : wordpress themes momizat Tutorial wordpress templates

 

The Curious Case of Specialty WordPress Themes

Have you ever needed a website that should be built with WordPress Themes, but also should push the boundaries of this beautiful content management system? Ever needed to create a WordPress Themeswebsite to share code snippets, or set up an online course to sell your knowledge, or build a support system for your agency?

Sometimes, a theme and a bunch of plugins won’t work for our project. Sometimes, we need a complete system with a decent design and solid functionality. That’s where specialty themes come into play.

A WordPress theme must be developed to change the look of a website and avoid offering functionality embedded in its core. That’s called “invading the plugin territory” and considered as a bad practice since you basically chain the user to your theme with the functionality you offer. Luckily, there is a solution: You can provide functionality through plugins that you require your users to install. To do so, you can use a PHP library like TGM Plugin Activation.

But sometimes, a project requires that design and functionality work together. In this case, we have an exception, and the exception’s name, used throughout the WordPress market, is “specialty themes.”

If you decide to make a specialty theme for WordPress, you might want to consider a few things:

You must offer a unique approach in order to present your theme as a “specialty theme”. Go bananas if you like (if you’re certain that somebody will make use of your theme) and make the most eccentric theme the community has ever seen. Seriously, the community could use some variety in themes.

Actions and filters are part of the WordPress Plugin API, but that doesn’t necessarily mean themes can’t benefit from them. In fact, all of the most popular WordPress theme frameworks utilize actions and filters (mainly actions) so other developers can extend the frameworks. Follow their lead and make your theme extendable with WordPress action and filter hooks.

Here’s your “A-ha!” moment if you want to make more of your theme by diversifying design options—make your theme ready for child themes! Build your base theme (like a theme framework) and create child themes to offer different designs.

If you feel that other themes can benefit from a part of your functionality, go ahead and offer it as a plugin and require it by using the TGM Plugin Activation library. But in most cases, specialty themes’ functionalities can’t be used with other themes; so it would seem like a vain effort to convert the functionality.

But keep in mind that developers might create themes after you release your specialty theme, so it’s still a good idea to separate functionality from design.

There are so many types of specialty themes which can be made that it would be pointless to try to list all of them. But to get the idea, let’s write a few:

  • a job board
  • a question and answer system
  • a help desk
  • a learning management system
  • a crowdfunding website
  • a domain sale page
  • a “coming soon” page
  • a simple online wedding invitation
  • a knowledge base
  • a directory website
  • a contact manager
  • …and more

As I said earlier, any good idea could be—and should be—turned into a specialty theme. If you think you have a good idea to make an original specialty theme, go for it.

[quote font=”verdana” font_size=”14″ font_style=”italic” color=”#474747″ bgcolor=”#F5F5F5″ bcolor=”#dd9933″ arrow=”yes” align=”centre”]This Demo Content Brought to you by Momizat Team [/quote]

this is tags and keywords : wordpress themes momizat Tutorial wordpress templates

 

Migrating A Website To WordPress

Now powering over 17% of the Web, WordPress is increasingly becoming the content management system (CMS) of choice for the average user. But what about websites built with an outdated CMS or without a CMS at all? Does moving to WordPress mean starting over and losing all the time, energy and money put into the current website? Nope!

Migrating a website (including the design) over to WordPress is actually easier than you might think. In this guide, we’ll outline the migration process and work through the steps with a sample project. We’ll also cover some of the challenges you might encounter and review the solutions.

WordPress Themes

About This Guide

Before we get to work, let’s establish some context. First, this guide was written primarily with beginners in mind and will be most helpful for basic websites. Some of you will likely encounter advanced aspects of WordPress migration, but they are beyond the scope of this guide. If you’re tackling an advanced migration and get stuck, feel free to share your difficulty in the comments below.

OBJECTIVES

The objective of this guide is to help you with the following:

  • Plan an effective migration to WordPress.
  • Walk through the technical steps involved in migrating.
  • Get ideas and resources to solve common migration challenges.
  • WordPress Themes

ASSUMPTIONS

I assume you have basic familiarity with WordPress. Previous development experience with WordPress would be helpful, but not necessary. I also assume you have an existing website and design that you want to migrate to WordPress.

Starting With A Plan

BASIC STEPS

Here are the basic steps that I recommend you follow for a typical WordPress migration:

  1. Evaluate website.
    Work carefully through the pages on your existing website, identifying all of the types of content (standard pages, photo galleries, resource pages, etc.) and noting any areas that need special attention.
  2. Set up environment.
    Set up WordPress and get ready to import.
  3. Import content.
    Bring over and organize your content, whether via an importing tool, manual entry (for a small amount, when no tool is available) or a custom importing process.
  4. Migrate design.
    Incorporate your existing design into a custom WordPress theme.
  5. Review website, go live.
    Carefully review the import, making adjustments where needed, set up any URL redirects, and then go live.
  6. WordPress Themes

With this outline in mind, let’s work through each step in detail.

Start With A Plan

The key to a successful migration is to carefully evaluate your current website. You need to figure out how to import and structure the content in WordPress before carrying over the design.

While the principles are the same across migration projects, the details often vary. So, below are two lists of questions to ask as you work out a plan.

IMPORTED CONTENT

  • How much content needs to be imported (number of pages, number of images, etc.)?
  • Is the volume low enough to be imported manually, or do you need a tool?
  • If you need a tool, does one already exist?
  • Can the content be categorized into the standard “posts” and “pages,” or does it call for custom post types?
  • Does extra content need to be stored for certain pages (custom fields, taxonomies, etc.)?
  • Will the URL structure change? If so, will the old URLs need to be redirected?

EXISTING FUNCTIONALITY

  • Does the website integrate any third-party services (data collection, reservations, etc.)?
  • Do any forms need to be migrated (contact forms, application forms, etc.)?
  • Is access to any content restricted (such as members-only content)?
  • Does the website sell products (digital or physical)?
  • Do any administrative tools need to be carried over (such as custom CMS functionality)?
  • WordPress Themes

A WORKING EXAMPLE

My brother, Joshua Wold, has volunteered a website to serve as an example; it’s for a side project of his in which he sells posters and postcards of a Vegan Food Pyramid. He built the website in plain HTML, with some basic PHP includes for the header and footer. Below is a screencast of me evaluating the website to give you a sense of how the process will work. Enjoy!

Set Up WordPress

Before importing the content, we need to get WordPress ready to go. If you’re just experimenting or if you prefer offline development, start with a local installation of WordPress. Otherwise, the next step is to install WordPress with your current hosting provider; or you could use the migration process as a great opportunity to move to a new host.

Once WordPress is up and running, you’re ready for action!

WordPress Themes

Setting Up WordPress

For our example, we’ve installed WordPress with the same host, setting it up in a wp directory for the duration of the migration process.

SETTINGS AND PLUGINS

With WordPress Themes installed, we’ll make a few minor adjustments:

  • Update permalinks.
    Go to Settings → Permalinks to make changes. In most cases, I’ll switch to “postname”-style permalinks.
  • Update users.
    I create an admin-level account for myself and any admin or editor accounts that are needed for clients and collaborators. I also remove the default “admin” user name if it exists (a basic but wise step for WordPress security).

Depending on the needs of the project, we might have to preinstall plugins. Here are the major categories of plugins:

  • Form management
    Migrating a form “as is” is usually a mess; simply recreating it using a forms plugin is usually easier. My current favorite is Gravity Forms ($39+ per license). Other options are Formidable (with free and pro versions) and Contact Form 7 (entirely free).
  • SEO management
    Search engine optimization (SEO) is a touchy subject. My philosophy is to build content for people, not for search engines. That being said, there is a common-sense approach to SEO that is solidly supported by the WordPress plugin ecosystem. And if your old website includes custom meta descriptions, giving them a new home during the importing process is important. I recommendWordPress SEO (free).
  • Multiple languages
    If your old website supports multiple languages, WordPress has you covered. My plugin of choice is WPML ($79 per license, free for non-profits). Another option isqTranslate (free).
  • Security
    WordPress security is a topic near and dear to me. The increasing popularity of WordPress has made it a target for security attacks. WordPress itself is rarely the problem; a poorly secured hosting environment or an outdated or poorly developed plugin usually is. I use managed WordPress hosting for the majority of my projects, which offers a good foundation for solid WordPress security. Options include WPEngine, ZippyKid, Pagely and Synthesis. In addition to managed hosting (and especially if you opt for a non-managed host), consider installing a security plugin, such as Better WP Security (free) or Wordfence (also free). Last but not least, review the “Hardening WordPress” guide in the Codex.
  • Backups
    If you opt for managed hosting, backups are usually included (make sure, though). If you’re managing backups yourself or you want an extra layer of data protection, great options are available, including VaultPress ($15+ a month), CodeGuard ($5+ a month), BackupBuddy ($75+ per license) and BackWPup (free).
  • from : http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2013/05/15/migrate-existing-website-to-wordpress/[quote font=”verdana” font_size=”14″ font_style=”italic” color=”#474747″ bgcolor=”#F5F5F5″ bcolor=”#dd9933″ arrow=”yes” align=”centre”]This Demo Content Brought to you by Momizat Team [/quote]

    this is tags and keywords : wordpress themes momizat Tutorial wordpress templates

How To Contribute To WordPress Themes Community

How To Contribute To WordPress Themes Community

WordPress is built by volunteers. People from all over the world collaborate to create the core software, write the documentation, provide support, translate WordPress, organize events and generally keep the project running. Individuals work on WordPress in their free time, and companies ask their employees to get involved.

Part of WordPress’ success is that the community consists not only of developers, but of designers, user experience experts, support volunteers, writers, users, accessibility experts and enthusiasts. This diverse input strengthens the project. It also means you have more space to get involved. Whatever your skill set, the WordPress community has room for you.

splash
A bunch of WordPress contributors.

In this article, we’ll talk about the different contributor groups and how you can take part. I spoke with the current team reps and project leads, who have offered advice on how to get started with their contributor groups. But first, why should you get involved with WordPress?

Why Get Involved?

I had a chat with Matt Mullenweg, one of the founding developers of WordPress, about contributing to the project. We started off talking about the mix of people who contribute to WordPress. There are contributors who are sponsored by businesses that use WordPress, such as Automattic, Dreamhost and 10up, and then there are passionate individuals who dedicate their own time to the project.

“People who use WordPress are passionate about open source, want to democratize publishing and like to learn. I would say that’s the number-one biggest characteristic, because contributing to open source, and particularly the WordPress project, is probably one of the best learning opportunities on the Internet.”

matt mullenweg
Matt chats about the future of WordPress at the WordPress Community Summit 2012. (Image:konsobe)

For Matt, this is the greatest benefit you will get from contributing. You get to be part of a large, supportive community that has an impact on the lives of millions and millions of people. Something you do in an afternoon can have an effect on people all over the world.

“You can’t knock on the door at Google and say, “Hey, do you mind if I help you out with your home page? I have some ideas for you.” But you could come to us and say, “Hey, I have some ideas for your dashboard, and here are some patches.””

A number of challenges face the WordPress project:

  • Contributor balance
    Currently, the number of contributors is skewed towards people involved with code. Plenty of opportunities lie in other areas — support, documentation and marketing, for example — but not so many people are getting involved.
  • Mobile
    Not enough people are getting involved with mobile. Most of the people involved with mobile are currently sponsored by Automattic. Because mobile is fast becoming the way that people interact with the Internet, this is a crucial group and currently has a dearth of contributors.

With that in mind, let’s look at the ways you can get involved with WordPress.

Core

Mark Jaquith is an independent developer and one of the lead developers of WordPress. These days, he is a jack of all trades in the project, working closely with younger and newer developers, helping to point them in the right direction. He was also the release lead for the 3.6 release cycle. The core team comprises all sorts of developers and designers — PHP and JavaScript developers and front-end developers and designers. These are the people who build the WordPress that you install on your server.

mark jaquith
Being a lead WordPress developer makes Mark Jaquith happy. (Image: Michael Yoshitaka Erlewine)

I asked Mark how the the core contributor team works. He describes it as a set of concentric rings:

“You have the leads in the inner sanctum, and then you have the people with permanent commit access, and then you have the people to whom we give temporary commit access for release, and then there are the people whose patches are implicitly trusted and go in without too much inspection. It just keeps going out from there. Those are very fluid boundaries, so people flow between them.”

CHALLENGES

As much as possible, the core team tries to work by consensus. Issues are discussed, publicly if possible, although anything contentious may be addressed in private discussion.

One of the biggest challenges facing WordPress is that not everyone is on the project full time. Even Automattic employees have other responsibilities within Automattic. This means that people can contribute varying amounts of time. If a lot of people see a dip in their free time, this can cause problems for the project. The core team tries to mitigate this by having more contributors and more people who can commit. However, a balance has to be struck because if there are too many committers, no one would know what’s going on.

GET INVOLVED

You can start getting involved in a number of ways:

  • Live chats
    Tap into the weekly live chats (Wednesdays 21:00 UTC, irc.freenode.net, #wordpress-dev). Before diving in, you should gauge at what point in the release cycle the project is at:

    • Early stages
      Planning the next release.
    • Middle stages
      Guiding the features and checking on progress.
    • Final stages
      Bug scrubs.
    • After a release
      Mostly an open forum, a good time to ask for advice on moving your ticket forward.
  • Firehose
    You can subscribe to trac notifications and get notified of every comment in every ticket. It’s a lot of data to process, but you should get an idea of how the project works, various people’s roles, how much authority they have, and best practices.
  • Ideas
    If you have an idea for a feature or anything else WordPress-related, a good place to start is to write a blog post about it. There is an ideas forum, but it’s not very well used. If you have a concrete idea, with a vision of how to implement it, a blog post may well get you more traction. It will give you space to flesh out the idea and provide an opportunity for other community members to comment on it.

Ready to get involved with WordPress core? Other than development skills, I asked Mark what skills someone should have:

“The number one skill you need for just about any job, but specifically working on open source, is communication skills. You need to have clarity, consistency, compassion, relatability, a little bit of a thick skin and a decent sense of humor.”

from : http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2014/08/27/a-tour-of-wordpress-4-0/

[quote font=”verdana” font_size=”14″ font_style=”italic” color=”#474747″ bgcolor=”#F5F5F5″ bcolor=”#dd9933″ arrow=”yes” align=”centre”]This Demo Content Brought to you by Momizat Team [/quote]

this is tags and keywords : wordpress themes momizat Tutorial wordpress templates

Practical Tips From Top WordPress Pros

Practical Tips From Top WordPress Pros Recently I shared with you some advice from the WordPress community to beginners. But what if starting out is already a dim memory? What if you’re already so immersed in the world of WordPress that you dream of Trac and you bore your partner with talk of your latest achievement with custom post types?

Below are some tips from WordPress pros from across the community. Many of the tips cover development, but there’s also advice on business, running your website and, of course, getting involved with the community.

Wordpress-start-image
Image: Phil Oakley

Tips For Developers

USE EVERYTHING WORDPRESS HAS TO OFFER

WordPress’ core can do a lot for you, without you having to write a bunch of code. WordPress is much more powerful when you make use of its APIs and built-in functionality. “If you use WordPress as your framework,” says Trent Lapinski, “it will enable you to focus on developing an innovative plugin or theme.”

Matty Cohen recommends always looking for and using functionality available within WordPress before creating a function from scratch. “Examples of this include, at the higher level, using the WordPress Settings API and, at the lower level, using themedia_handle_upload() function to upload your files, rather than a custom upload routine.” Matty gives an example of this with his WooSlider plugin. In order to create a familiar and consistent experience for WooThemes users, he did the following:

  • He used the Settings API for the settings screen.
  • He added a tab to the “Upload/Insert Media” popup for creating shortcodes. This interface uses a combination of the Settings API, custom form-creation logic, and some custom JavaScript to create the HTML output and the shortcode.

Screenshot of WooSlider settings
WooSlider uses built-in WordPress functionality to make the user experience better.

Making use of everything WordPress has to offer results in less coding for you and a better overall experience for users. But those aren’t the only benefits. Amy Hendrix points out that the code you write will be future-proof. Writing your own scripts could eventually result in conflicts.

USE HOOKS

Hooks are the means by which you hook into WordPress and add your own code without modifying core files. There are two types of hooks: actions and filters. Action hooks are places where you can insert and run code. Filters are used to manipulate output.

If you’re working with WordPress’ core and with plugins and themes, then you should be extending by making use of all of the hooks available. Adam Brown maintains a list of all of the hooks that have ever appeared in WordPress.

IMPLEMENT HOOKS

Create your own hooks. By implementing hooks in your plugins and themes, you create opportunities for other people to extend them and create add-ons. Shane Pearlmanbelieves that by doing so, you “encourage plugin developers to make opportunities for the community to extend and also use them.”

Not only does this create opportunities for other developers, but you make life easier for yourself. “With a ‘well-hooked’ theme or plugin,” says Simon Wheatley, “you can make adjustments between clients, or between sites on a multisite setup, a lot more easily than by effectively forking your own code for every scenario.”

WRITE SECURE CODE

If you write plugins or themes, keeping the code secure is critical. How bad would you feel if your code was responsible for websites getting hacked? Brad Williamsrecommends learning how data validation pertains to WordPress. A detailed page on data validation can be found in the Codex; so, if you’re a developer, you have no excuse for writing insecure WordPress plugins and themes. Following the guidelines will ensure that your code is safe and secure from exploits and hacks. As Ryan Hellyer points out, “Having a beautiful website which does exactly what a client requires is great, but it’s not so great when it gets injected with spam links and is de-indexed from search engines!”

FOLLOW BEST PRACTICES

Ryan Duff and Brad Williams highlight some best practices that developers should stick to:

  • Make sure the data that you’re passing is always being passed in the way it’s expected to. Setting a variable on an incorrect line could result in a trickle-down effect of error messages.
  • WordPress has coding standards, so stick to them. This will keep your code in a format that all WordPress developers will recognize, making bug tracking much easier!

EMBRACE THE CODE BASE

Both Helen Hou-Sandi and Jake Goldman of 10up recommend that you spend time looking at the code base. As Jake points out, “Relying on the Codex and Google searches for solving unique problems with WordPress is like trying to tune a car’s performance without ever looking under the hood.” Rachel Baker also suggests looking at the change logs, and Silviu-Cristian Burcă points us to his advice in “How to Become a WordPress Guru.”

A good integrated development environment (IDE) for PHP — such as NetBeans, PhpStorm, phpDesigner or Vanilla Eclipse — will offer code auto-completion for WordPress functions and their arguments and will display documentation on functions inline. You’ll be able to easily jump to function and class declarations to study them. “Think the core code base is too scary?” asks Jake. “Pick a file in wp-includes and start reading — you might be surprised by how approachable it is, and how much you can learn.”

Looking at the code, as Helen adds, also increases the likelihood that you’ll find a way to contribute code to the WordPress project. You’ll also become familiar with plugins and themes, understand how people do things properly, and recognize when they get it wrong.

SHARE YOUR CODE

It’s in the nature of code in an open-source project to be shared, forked and iterated on. If you’re working on solutions, then share them with the community. “Share and publish your solutions, as a plugin, widget or theme,” says Cátia Kitahara. “Not for every project, but with most of them, we end up with a solution that could be of use to many others. So, do it as a way of giving back to the community. I know it takes time to prepare something to be distributed through the repositories, but remember the time WordPress saves for us!”

You could put your code on GitHub, which Ben Balter recommends:

“GitHub’s got a very different culture, and the ability for anyone to submit a pull request is a real game changer. It really lowers the barrier to contribute, and democratizes the entire plugin authoring experience. As a bonus, use GitHub’s built-in wiki functionality to maintain your plugin’s documentation (especially FAQ), so that anyone, even non-technical users, can contribute.

Lastly, if you have plugin tests, integrate with Travis CI so that you can automatically test pull requests before merging. To help you get started, a handful of tools are out there, such as GitHub → WordPress.org deployment scripts and GitHub wiki → WordPress readme converters.”

Eric Mann points out that if you’ve built your project in isolation, then you’re likely missing out on different approaches. Sharing your code with people gives them the opportunity to point out how it can be improved. WordPress itself is built collaboratively and is the result of hundreds of minds looking at it from different perspectives. If you want your code to excel, you should be sharing it, too.

USE CUSTOM POST TYPES

Taking advantage of custom post types for specific use cases is a great way to leverage WordPress. At the Theme Foundry, Drew Strojny has three custom post types: themes, stories and tutorials. This enables members of his team to quickly find and create content.

Drew recommends making custom post types even more flexible by adding custom meta data. This enables you to style your content and provides opportunities to reuse that meta data across your website. He provides the example of the meta data he uses with the “Story” post type in use on his “Customer Stories” page.

from : http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2013/03/20/practical-tips-top-wordpress-pros/

[quote font=”verdana” font_size=”14″ font_style=”italic” color=”#474747″ bgcolor=”#F5F5F5″ bcolor=”#dd9933″ arrow=”yes” align=”centre”]This Demo Content Brought to you by Momizat Team [/quote]

this is tags and keywords : wordpress themes momizat Tutorial wordpress templates