Anatomy of A WordPress Themes

WordPress themes

A while ago, we introduced to you the concept of creating a WordPress theme from HTML. We split the tutorial into two parts, and you can check out the first installation here and the second here. Today we are all about fleshing out the two tutorials, so feel free to regard this post as the third serving in the post series. My objective is to take apart the WordPress theme to give you a clear picture of how it (the theme) works.

This post assumes you have a working knowledge of HTML and CSS. I will go ahead and declare that having HTML and CSS skills is a prerequisite in designing WordPress themes. One more thing, this post will stay clear of big words and difficult concepts – it will be easy to comprehend, so be ready to have fun and learn.

A Little HTML Priming

Every HTML web page is split into different parts using the <div> tag. For instance, you can break the body (<body>) of your website into several sections such as navigation, header, main content, sidebar and footer amongst others.

Once you have your web page in sections, you can order (or arrange) the sections as you wish using CSS. This process is known as styling, and it involves adding other style elements such as color, size, borders, special effects etc. Such is the power of CSS, which – by the way – is short for Cascading Style Sheets. When you put your HTMl and CSS files together and throw in a couple of images, you end up with a complete website.

Things are not very different with WordPress themes. As we saw in part 1 of How To Create A WordPress Theme from HTML, WordPress themes are split into different files. If you cannot spot some similarity at this point, allow me to explain.

Static HTML web pages are split into divisions (what we called sections earlier on) using <div> tags (or tables if you’re really old school). On the other hand, WordPress themes are split into different php files, which are then put back together using template tags.

Therefore, instead of having all body elements (header, main content, sidebar, footer etc) living in a single file (as is the case with static HTML), each of the body elements (in WordPress themes) lives in a separate files.

So, the header will live in header.php, the sidebar will find home in sidebar.php, the main content will live in index.php, or single.php (if it’s a post) or page.php (if it’s a page). The footer section will live in footer.php and so on.

Are you following? Check out the illustration below:

Proin tristique elit et augue varius pellentesque. Donec enim neque, vulputate et commodo in, tristique sed velit. Phasellus adipiscing faucibus felis eget hendrerit. Vestibulum aliquet mauris sed felis convallis, sed tempus augue malesuada. Vivamus mauris lorem, laoreet sed suscipit nec, dapibus at elit. In in augue lobortis, eleifend tortor et, varius eros. Vivamus dignissim sed justo vitae suscipit. Mauris mi sem, malesuada sed sapien ut, sagittis condimentum urna. Nullam lacus mi, vulputate sed sollicitudin in, semper ut elit. Phasellus nec est at leo euismod placerat a porttitor est. Curabitur vel varius nunc, nec tincidunt magna. Proin eros mauris, lobortis id quam non, euismod fringilla nulla. Fusce vel nisi et turpis tempor molestie sit amet a dolor.

THEMATIC (CHILD) THEMES

Thematic uses Child Themes, these are essentially stripped down versions of a full WP theme, that needs the Thematic Framework for functionality. Upon download, Thematic comes packaged with a basic child theme, but you can download many more from the Thematic homepage. Download Thematic Child Themes.

Below, you will find a small selection of themes available for Thematic.

Acamas Child Theme

[quote font=”verdana” font_size=”14″ font_style=”italic” color=”#474747″ bgcolor=”#F5F5F5″ bcolor=”#dd9933″ arrow=”yes” align=”centre”]This Demo Content Brought to you by Momizat Team [/quote]

this is tags and keywords : wordpress themes momizat Tutorial wordpress templates

 

Quick Tour Of WordPress 4

WordPress Themes has released the first release candidate (RC) for the upcoming 4.0 version. According to the official version numbering, WordPress 4.0 is no more or less significant than 3.9 was or 4.1 will be. That being said, a new major release is always a cause for excitement! Let’s take a look at the new features the team at WordPress has been working on for us. wordpress themes

Installation Language

Since I’ve always used wordpress themes in English, it took me a while to realize how important internationalization is. 29% of all WordPress.com installations use a non-English language which is huge and not that far from more than a quarter of all installations. Version 4.0 makes it much easier to get WordPress to speak your language. In fact, the first installation screen asks you to choose your native tongue. Nice!

This is a big step up from either having to download in your own language, or grabbing language files manually and modifying the config.

Embed Previews For URLs

Embedding content into posts has also become a much nicer process. One of my irks with the visual editor used to be that it wasn’t visual enough. Not that long ago, you just got a grey box in place of a gallery or other media/embed items. The “Smith” release took care of galleries and 4.0 is taking care of a host of other items. If you paste a YouTube URL in text mode, it will render as a video in visual mode. How handy is that?

I find this a lot more pleasing to work with — I see exactly what I’m going to get. The media modal’s insert from the URL feature is getting the same upgrade. As soon as you’ve entered a URL, the video will load — playable and all! The good news is that it works with all the services you’d expect, from Vimeo to Twitter, Hulu and Flickr. Scott Taylor (who is a core contributor working on this) has kindly gathered some test URLs. I recommend checking outTrac ticket to find out more in this regard.

Media Section Grid

The media section now has a grid view by default. This isn’t a groundbreaking coding feat by any measure, but it does introduce a sleeker UI which is perhaps a glimpse of what is coming up in the future.

While this is a minor change, it does give you a way better overview of your media files than the default view of 20 images in a list.

Plugin Discovery And Installation

In my opinion, the plugin “Add New” page got a much needed makeover. The top navigation looks a lot like the new navigation in the media section — another indication of a slightly more modern interface creeping into the system. Plugins in the list view are displayed in a much more visual fashion, and it looks like it’s time for developers to start making thumbnails! While the plugin details screen could use a makeover as well, I’m sure this is a work in progress and will be explored further.

Better Post Editing

One feature I’m particularly happy with is how the editor height has been changed to use screen real estate better. Mark Jaquith painted a great picture of the problem:

“The post editor feels like it has been relegated to a box of medium importance on the edit/compose screen.”

UI Improvements For Widget Customization

It’s great that widgets have been included in the wordpress themes customizer. Usually, if you had more than five to six widgets, things became a bit too crowded. Fortunately, the new WP version has now put all widgets into a sub-section of the customization screen. This essentially minimizes them when not needed — a welcome UI improvement for sure!

Join The Fun

As always, the latest development versions can be tried out pretty easily. By installing theWordPress Beta Tester plugin you can update to the latest beta builds or nightlies and play around with the brand new features.

If you happen to find any bugs, you can add them to the WordPress Trac and you can even fix them and contribute to the core! wordpress themes is a community project, and every little bit helps!

from : http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2014/08/27/a-tour-of-wordpress-4-0/

[quote font=”verdana” font_size=”14″ font_style=”italic” color=”#474747″ bgcolor=”#F5F5F5″ bcolor=”#dd9933″ arrow=”yes” align=”centre”]This Demo Content Brought to you by Momizat Team [/quote]

this is tags and keywords : wordpress themes momizat Tutorial wordpress templates

 

Speed Up Your WordPress Themes

WordPress Themes can be more faster than you think let’s see how !!?

A few months ago, I ran an experiment to see how much faster I could make one of my websites in less than two hours of work. After installing a handful of WordPress plugins and fixing a few simple errors, I had improved the website’s loading speed from 1.61 seconds to 583 milliseconds. That’s a 70.39% improvement, without having made any visual changes to the website.

According to a 2009 Akamai study, 47% of visitors expect a page to load in under 2 seconds, and 57% of visitors will abandon a page that takes more than 3 seconds to load. Since this study, no shortage of case studies have confirmed that loading time affects sales.

In 2006, Amazon reported that a 100-millisecond increase in page speed translated to a 1% increase in its revenue. Just a few years later, Google announced in a blog post that its algorithm takes page speed into account when ranking websites.

So, how can you speed up your WordPress website?

Below are twelve quick fixes that will dramatically improve your website’s loading time, including:

  • identifying which plugins are slowing down your website;
  • automatically compressing Web pages, images, JavaScript and CSS files;
  • keeping your website’s database clean;
  • setting up browser caching the right way.

Lay The Foundation

When your house is sinking into the ground, you don’t polish the windows — you fix the foundations. The same goes for your website. If it’s hosted on a sluggish server or has a bloated theme, quick fixes won’t help. You’ll need to fix the foundation.

So, let’s start with what makes for a good foundation and how to set ourselves up for a website that runs at lightening speed.

CHOOSE A GOOD HOST

Your Web hosting company and hosting package have a huge impact on the speed of your website, among many other important performance-related things. I used to be sucked in by the allure of free or cheap hosting, but with the wisdom of hindsight, I’ve learned that hosting isn’t an area to skimp on.

To put this into perspective, two of my clients have similar websites but very different hosting providers. One uses WPEngine (an excellent hosting company), and the other hosts their website on a cheap shared server.

The DNS response time (i.e. the time it takes for the browser to connect to the hosting server) of the client using WPEngine is 7 milliseconds. The client using the cheap shared hosting has a DNS response time of 250 milliseconds.

If you want your website to run quickly, start with a good hosting company and package.

CHOOSE A GOOD THEME

Unfortunately, not all WordPress themes are created equal. While some are extremely fast and well coded, others are bloated with hundreds of bells and whistles under the pretence of being “versatile and customizable.”

A few years ago, Julian Fernandes of Synthesis ran an interesting case study in which he updated his theme from WordPress’ default to the Genesis framework, monitoring page speed. He noticed that just by changing the theme to Genesis, his loading time improved from 630 to 172 milliseconds.

When you choose a theme, check the page speed of the theme’s demo, using a tool such as Pingdom, to see how quickly it runs with nothing added to it. This should give you an idea of how well coded it is.

USE A CONTENT DELIVERY NETWORK

I recently started using a content delivery network (CDN) for one of my websites and noticed a 55% reduction in bandwidth usage and a huge improvement in page-loading speed.

A CDN hosts your files across a huge network of servers around the world. If a user from Argentina visits your website, then they would download files from the server closest to them geographically. Because your bandwidth is spread across so many different servers, the load on any single server is reduced.

Setting up a CDN can take a few hours, but it’s usually one of the quickest ways to dramatically improve page-loading speed.

12 Quick Fixes To Speed Up WordPress

Now that our foundation is solid, we can begin fine-tuning our website.

A good way to start speeding up a website is to look at what can be removed. More often than not, a website is slow not because of what it lacks but because of what it already has.

1. IDENTIFY PLUGINS THAT ARE SLOWING YOU DOWN

P3 is one of my favourite diagnostic plugins because it shows you the impact of your other plugins on page-loading time. This makes it easy to spot any plugins that are slowing down your website.

A common culprit is social-sharing plugins, most of which bloat page-loading times and can easily be replaced by embedding social buttons into the theme’s source code.

Once you’re aware of which plugins are slowing down your website, you can make an informed decision about whether to keep them, replace them or remove them entirely.

2. COMPRESS YOUR WEBSITE

When you compress a file on your computer as a ZIP file, the total size of the file is reduced, making it both easier and faster to send to someone. Gzip works in exactly the same way but with your Web page files.

Once installed, Gzip automatically compresses your website’s files as ZIP files, saving bandwidth and speeding up page-loading times. When a user visits your website, their browser will automatically unzip the files and show their contents. This method of transmitting content from the server to the browser is far more efficient and saves a lot of time.

There is virtually no downside to installing Gzip, and the increase in speed can be quite dramatic. As we can see in the screenshot above, MusicLawContracts.com goes from 68 KB to only 13 KB with Gzip installed.

for more : http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2014/06/25/how-to-speed-up-your-wordpress-website/

[quote font=”verdana” font_size=”14″ font_style=”italic” color=”#474747″ bgcolor=”#F5F5F5″ bcolor=”#dd9933″ arrow=”yes” align=”centre”]This Demo Content Brought to you by Momizat Team [/quote]

this is tags and keywords : wordpress themes momizat Tutorial wordpress templates

 

Best Permalink Structure

 

You have to change you timezone, the tagline, your user profile information, and much more.

Perhaps one that setting that needs to change but that has stumped quite a few is the Permalink setting. You are given quite a few options there, but which one is the best to use?

What Is A Permalink?

To those new to the realms of the online world, the word Permalink likely doesn’t make any sense, but it’s not that complicated.

A Permalink is like the exact address to a specific page on your website. For example:

http://yourwebsite.com/ would bring someone to the Homepage of your site whereas,http://yourwebsite.com/blog/ would bring them to your the blog page on your site. Those are pretty straightforward permalink structures, but when it comes to posts on your site, the permalink structure may look a little bit different.

Permalink Options in WordPress

WordPress gives users a few options when choosing a permalink structure:

  • Default
  • Day and Name | Uses the year, month, and the day along with your post title in the link.
  • Month and Name | Uses year and month along with the post title in the link.
  • Numeric | Uses a number as part of the link.
  • Post Name | Simply uses the title of your post in the link.
  • Custom Structure | Allows you to set up your own link structure to reflect something closer to what you’d like.

As you can guess, many WordPress installs have the Default setting automatically put in place, but it’s not one you want to leave as is.

Which Permalink Structure is Best?

In this case, there is no single answer, though some may have strong feelings about one structure over another. What I can tell you is that you shouldn’t use the Default option. So which one should you use?

Post Name

This is the one that many people like to choose as their permalink structure. This option is nice for both Search Engines and your viewers as the link is very easy to understand because it uses the post title. Since Search Engines can read this plain as day many people like to say that it has SEO benefits.

If you decide to go with this one, you’d be just fine.

Day and Name; Month and Name

These two options are pretty similar, however, the Day and Name option will make your permalink a bit longer than the Month and Name option. This isn’t exactly a bad thing so you can choose one over the other and be all set.

There are some hidden benefits to using these structures. Besides creating these “Pretty Links” that flirt rather well with Google, they also help keep a site from breaking if your site publishes multiple posts every day (Day and Name is best for news type sites with daily/hourly updates). If you publish quite a few posts every week, the Month and Name option would likely be your best option.

Wrapping It Up

As far as SEO is concerned, one structure doesn’t seem to do any good over another. Although Post Name is a nice and simple option, I’d opt for either the Day and Name or Month and Name option just to keep things going smoothly. If you’re feeling adventurous, you could even try out the Custom Structure option like some popular blogs use.

If you want more in-depth coverage of Permalinks, be sure to check out this post byKevin Muldoon.

 

 

from :http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/creating-child-themes-for-your-wordpress-theme-framework–cms-21933

[quote font=”verdana” font_size=”14″ font_style=”italic” color=”#474747″ bgcolor=”#F5F5F5″ bcolor=”#dd9933″ arrow=”yes” align=”centre”]This Demo Content Brought to you by Momizat Team [/quote]

this is tags and keywords : wordpress themes momizat Tutorial wordpress  templates

Add Nofollow Links in WordPress Navigation Menus

Many site owners prefer to add a nofollow tag to all external links. Adding a nofollow attribute to links in WordPress is extremely simple. However, it is not as clear for navigation menus. In this article, we will show you how to add nofollow links in WordPress navigation menus.

First start by adding the external link to your WordPress navigation menu just like you would add any custom link.

Simply visit Appearance » Menus and click on the link tab. Enter the URL and link text and then click on add to menu button.

Adding a custom link in WordPress menus

The external link you added will now appear in the Menu Structure column. You need to click on the downward arrow to expand the menu item. Like this:

Expanding a menu item

Next, click on the Screen Options button at the top right corner of the screen and check the boxes next to Link Relationship (XFN) and Link Target options.

Adding link relationship and target options to menu items

Now scroll back down to your expanded menu item, and you will notice two new options. Link Relationship and Open link in a new window/tab. You need to enternofollow in the link relationship option. You can also check the open link in new window/tab option if you want.

Adding nofollow to an outgoing link in navigation menus

Lastly, click on the Save Menu button to store your changes.

That’s all, you can now preview your site.

To make sure that a nofollow attribute is added to your link, you can take the mouse to the external link, right click and select inspect element. Your browser window will split into two. In the bottom window you will be able to see the HTML source for your link. It will display the nofollow attribute with your link.

An external link with nofollow attribute in WordPress navigation menu

We hope this article helped you learn how to add nofollow links in WordPress navigation menus. You may also like our tutorial on how to add image icons to navigation menus in WordPress.

If you liked this article, then please subscribe to our YouTube Channel for WordPress video tutorials. You can also find us on Twitter and Google+.

from :http://www.wpbeginner.com/wp-tutorials/how-to-add-nofollow-links-in-wordpress-navigation-menus/

[quote font=”verdana” font_size=”14″ font_style=”italic” color=”#474747″ bgcolor=”#F5F5F5″ bcolor=”#dd9933″ arrow=”yes” align=”centre”]This Demo Content Brought to you by Momizat Team [/quote]

this is tags and keywords : wordpress themes momizat Tutorial wordpress  templates